Chocolate Mousse Pie with Phyllo Crust

Chocolate Mousse Pie with Phyllo Crust

Around the holiday season, a lot people put the emphasis on the main course or finding the perfect easy, yet satisfying appetizer; whereas, for me it’s all about dessert. The more the merrier, the more complicated, the more impressive, and the better the table photographs… Am I right or am I right? I absolutely love trying something new and exciting for a holiday meal, but it is definitely a little nerve-racking not knowing if your dish is going to turn out well of if that back-up pie in the freezer is going to make an appearance.  This next recipe is the perfect star for your Christmas dessert table.

I made this mousse for Thanksgiving this year and let me tell you it was everything short of a Thanksgiving miracle. First, I bought puff pastry instead of phyllo dough. Heads up, I could only find phyllo dough at Gelson’s which was up bright and early Thanksgiving and basically saved the day. Second, I thought I was being brilliant by using a spring form pan- no need for a parchment paper lift apparatus. Too bad, I let the phyllo dough fall and bake right over the spring form release. Also, half way through the phyllo draping butter process, I ran out of butter and had to stop and melt another stick. Note to readers: buy correct dough, double the butter, use spring form pan, but do a better job “crumpling” the dough above the edge of the pan, try not to let it bake over the edges or else you will have a shorter, crust like mine.

Chocolate Mousse Pie with Phyllo Crust

ingredients:
CRUST
1 stick unsalted butter, melted, plus more for cake pan (I doubled this)
8 sheets thawed frozen phyllo dough (each 17 by 12 inches)
2 to 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
3 1/2 ounces semisweet chocolate, melted

FILLING
4 large egg yolks
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon coarse salt
3 1/2 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (about 3/4 cup)
2 cups heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
Chocolate shavings, for serving (optional)

Chocolate Mousse Pie with Phyllo Crust

directions:
CRUST
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-2-inch cake pan (spring form is ideal), then line with two 17-by-2-inch strips of parchment, forming an X in center and leaving a 2-inch overhang. Butter parchment.

Place 1 sheet of phyllo on a work surface with a long side facing you, keeping remaining phyllo covered with plastic wrap. Lightly brush entire surface with melted butter, then sprinkle some of granulated sugar on right half of phyllo. Fold left half over to enclose sugar. Brush top lightly with butter. Press folded phyllo into pan, buttered-side down, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang on one side; gather and crumple dough slightly as you go to make fit and to create a ruffled edge. Repeat with remaining phyllo sheets, overlapping to completely cover bottom of pan and create a 1/2-inch overhang on all sides. Bake until golden, about 20 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes.

Brush melted chocolate over bottom and 1 inch up sides of crust. Refrigerate 10 minutes.

FILLING
Meanwhile, in a heatproof bowl set over a pot of simmering water, whisk together yolks, granulated sugar, and salt until sugar is dissolved. Whisk in bittersweet chocolate until melted. Remove from heat. Let cool 10 minutes.

Beat 1 cup cream until medium-stiff peaks form. Whisk one-third of whipped cream into chocolate mixture. Gently but thoroughly fold in remaining whipped cream. Pour mixture into cooled crust. Refrigerate at least 3 hours.

Beat remaining 1 cup cream with confectioners’ sugar until soft peaks form. Dollop onto pie, sprinkle with chocolate shavings, and serve.

Recipe from Martha Stewart.

Chocolate Mousse Pie with Phyllo Crust

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